Elizabeth I: A Study in Insecurity

During the half term, as I have done every May for the past seventeen years, I travelled to the Hay Literary Festival in Hay on Wye. In 1977, bookshop owner Richard Booth conceived a publicity stunt in which he declared Hay-on-Wye become an ‘independent kingdom’ with himself as its monarch and a National Anthem written by Les Penning, and 11 years later, Hay on Wye became home to the world-famous festival. Throughout the year Hay is home to more than two-dozen second hand book shops, which flaunt signs such as “Kindles are banned in the Kingdom of Hay” and “Reading zone only”, and for 10 days of the year, bibliophiles and creatives flock to the town and transform it in to an accelerated hub of imaginative thinking, creativity and even more books. So many books.

Elizabeth I: A Study in Insecurity

Anti-Semitism in the Labour Party

Recently, the Labour Party has been thrown under the microscope over accusations of antisemitism. Traditionally, we associate the Labour Party with a tolerant and liberal view, therefore these allegations have been somewhat shocking for many. It is no secret that many members of the Labour Party, including of course Jeremy Corbyn are supporters of the Palestinian cause, however the passion that arises from discussion of Israeli politics in Palestine over the last 70 years has caused a moment in time in which there is confusion over what constitutes antisemitism, and what is actually in fact a criticism of Israeli government policy.

Anti-Semitism in the Labour Party