How to be scared of death in style

So, you’re scared of dying? Which part scares you the most? Some people fear the lack of legacy they will leave behind, or rather their inflated perfectionist ego is petrified that they, destined for greatness, will only amount to a simple pile of ash and dust? Others fear the tragic loss of those around them, or perhaps the fact that they will have to leave someone else behind. Or, if you’re like me, you fear the more biological implications of death; you won’t exist, won’t feel, and worst of all, you won’t be conscious. People attempt to comfort you with the fact that you won’t know, because you’re dead, of course, but this just makes it worse. You would literally rather there be no life at all except yourself than you not existing, because the idea of not being is that terrifying to you… (It’s times like this I wish I was raised in an incredibly religious family that gave me some sort of hope for after I pull the plug). Exciting stuff, right? Well, wherever you fall, if it’s 3 am and you can’t sleep because you’re contemplating the elasticity of time and realise that your existence will be over faster than you can scream any outburst of profanity on your mind, continue reading, and channel that energy into being scared of death *in style*.

How to be scared of death in style

Racism in dance

Naturally, all ethnic minorities face adversity in any industry, but these trials seem particularly cut-throat in the world of dance, and, noticeably, appear to disproportionately affect black dancers in ballet- whether through racial stereotyping, biased casting, or the ruthless scrutiny of any dancer’s appearance, which is especially vicious for anyone who doesn’t fit euro-centric beauty standards and norms.

Racism in dance

The short digest of the Nervous Conditions of the UK and Africa

Unless you have been co-leasing with Patrick Star for the last 2 years, you will be familiar with the polarising issue of Brexit that has taken the UK by storm. In the face of a contested referendum and an uncertain future for our country, it is only natural for people to turn to some literary outlet as a means of navigating our precarious situation.

The short digest of the Nervous Conditions of the UK and Africa