The Lasting Effects of Agent Orange in Vietnam

War in Vietnam broke out in late 1955, and raged for twenty years. During this time, what was then The Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) and the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) fought for dominance of the entire country; as a result, the USA Army was brought in as a force against the ‘Red Scare’ – the onslaught of Communism that had begun spreading throughout South East Asia in a domino effect. Throughout the War, many military tactics were used, but perhaps the one that has left the most long-lasting effects is the use of chemical warfare – more specifically, the use of Agent Orange (a herbicide) that was deployed by US Soldiers during a ten year period from 1961 to 1971. By wiping out thousands of kilometres of vegetation as well as causing multiple health defects for both the Vietnamese people as well as the USA Army, the devastation caused by this method persists in the country to this day, and affects the lives of millions.

The Lasting Effects of Agent Orange in Vietnam

An SMT Scene

THE SCENE: Seven fifteen a.m. (07:15) on a Monday morning. JANE LUNNON is busy preparing the HEADMISTRESS’S OFFICE. As she tucks in the last chair, FIONNUALA KENNEDY swans in; files and marking in one hand, phone in the other. She is furiously Tweeting.

An SMT Scene

Eleanor of Aquitaine: The Beyoncé of 12th century Europe

Eleanor of Aquitaine (daughter of the tenth Duke of Aquitaine, William), is readily recognised by a horde of historians as one of the most powerful women operating on the continent and in Great Britain during the Medieval period. After her father’s death she became Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, and went onto gain the title of queen-consort of France, following her marriage to Louis VII of France. After their vicious annulment, she would go on to marry her previous husband’s vassal and fifth Anglo-Norman king of England, Henry II.

Eleanor of Aquitaine: The Beyoncé of 12th century Europe