A Brief History of the Rainbow

The rainbow flag as we know it today is the most widely recognised symbol of the LGBT pride movement. Its colours are vibrant and varied, and so are widely interpreted as representing these same qualities in the LGBT community, but Gilbert Baker (an activist and artist born in 1951) designed the flag with a specific meaning in mind for each stripe.

A Brief History of the Rainbow

Julie d’Aubigny

Julie d’Aubigny embodied just about everything that WHS pride week is about. A fearlessly individualistic, gritty by the gallon, incredibly musical (get your tickets to the pride party on Friday, lads) bisexual sword-wielding arsonist of the 17th century… No? That’s not what WHS pride week is about? Shame. Nevertheless, Julie d’Aubigny knew how to have a pretty good time of it.

Julie d’Aubigny

How Brooklyn nine-nine Shows That Coming Out Shouldn’t Be a Big Deal

Brooklyn nine-nine is a comedy TV show about a police precinct in Brooklyn. It follows the life of a few of the workers there who are close friends, including Rosa Diaz. Rosa is portrayed as quite an aggressive, reserved, caring and a generally badass person. In Episode 5 of Season 5, she comes out as bisexual to her friends and coworkers. In the next episode to her parents. But why is her coming out so important? Well, not only does it fit well with the context of the show and the nature of the characters but it relates to a wider theme of how coming out stories are being portrayed in the media.

How Brooklyn nine-nine Shows That Coming Out Shouldn’t Be a Big Deal

The Perils of Privilege

Are you familiar with the term ‘NIMBYism’? It stands for ‘Not In My Back-Yard’. Let me tell you a story to help you understand this concept in practice. About 6 years ago, my family together with many others in our community woke to discover that a neighbouring house had become a residence for homeless young people; this coincided with a spike in car crime and petty house burglaries in the area. Conversation about the subject became very interesting. The government had to do more to support young people, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds, and, of course, they it was necessary and a great idea to open up more homes to care for the homeless youth population… However, “not next door to us!” “For Heaven’s sake, there is a school down the road”, “the area is quiet and respectable”, and, above all, “house prices will inevitable suffer”. You see, anywhere else it qualified as an out and out duty, but Not In My Back Yard. Six years on, the home has closed its doors, been auctioned off, and a collective sigh of relief was breathed by the community.

The Perils of Privilege